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Sommy Somadina

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  1. Humans have been recording earthquakes for nearly 4,000 years. From the ones we know about, the first and the deadliest by far happened in China in 1556 A.D. On January 23 of that year, a powerful quake rocked the province of Shaanxi as well as the neighboring province of Shanxi, killing an estimated 830,000 people.

    Historical records often refer to this as the Jiajing Great Earthquake because it occurred during Emperor Jiajing’s reign during the Ming dynasty. The approximate death toll comes from local annals that also tracked 26 other earthquakes in the region. In those records, the description of the Jiajing earthquake is starkly different from the others: they describe leveled mountains, floods, fires that burned for days, and a drastically altered landscape. The annals estimated that some counties had lost about 60 percent of their population.

    Even though we can’t be certain of how accurate the estimate of fatalities was, Jiajing is still considered the deadliest earthquake today because its death toll is just so much higher than any other disaster. The closest in terms of casualties that we know of was the 2004 earthquake and tsunami in the Indian Ocean that killed an estimated 230,000 people across Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and India.

  2. Earthquakes were likely happening at the end
    of the Archean eon , roughly 2.5 billion years
    ago. As you might imagine, there’s no
    specific details of what was happening
    back then, so it’s hard to say much more than
    that. But series of Earthquakes have been occuring since then .

  3. The scientific study of earthquakes is comparatively new. Until the 18th century, few factual descriptions of earthquakes were recorded, and the natural cause of earthquakes was little understood. Those who did look for natural causes often reached conclusions that seem fanciful today; one popular theory was that earthquakes were caused by air rushing out of caverns deep in the Earth’s interior.

    The earliest earthquake for which we have descriptive information occurred in China in 1177 B.C. The Chinese earthquake catalog describes several dozen large earthquakes in China during the next few thousand years. Earthquakes in Europe are mentioned as early as 580 B.C., but the earliest for which we have some descriptive information occurred in the mid-16th century. The earliest known earthquakes in the Americas were in Mexico in the late 14th century and in Peru in 1471, but descriptions of the effects were not well documented. By the 17th century, descriptions of the effects of earthquakes were being published around the world – although these accounts were often exaggerated or distorted.

  4. Historical earthquakes is a list of significant earthquakes known to have occurred prior to the beginning of the 20th century.
    The world’s largest earthquake with an instrumentally documented magnitude occurred on May 22, 1960 near Valdivia, in southern Chile. It was assigned a magnitude of 9.5 by the United States Geological Survey. It is referred to as the “Great Chilean Earthquake” and the “1960 Valdivia Earthquake.”

  5. The scientific study of earthquakes is comparatively new. Until the 18th century, few factual descriptions of earthquakes were recorded, and the natural cause of earthquakes was little understood. Those who did look for natural causes often reached conclusions that seem fanciful today; one popular theory was that earthquakes were caused by air rushing out of caverns deep in the Earth’s interior.

    The earliest earthquake for which we have descriptive information occurred in China in 1177 B.C. The Chinese earthquake catalog describes several dozen large earthquakes in China during the next few thousand years. Earthquakes in Europe are mentioned as early as 580 B.C., but the earliest for which we have some descriptive information occurred in the mid-16th century. The earliest known earthquakes in the Americas.

  6. A dramatic picture of horses killed by a collapsed building wall in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    The scientific study of earthquakes is comparatively new. Until the 18th century, few factual descriptions of earthquakes were recorded, and the natural cause of earthquakes was little understood. Those who did look for natural causes often reached conclusions that seem fanciful today; one popular theory was that earthquakes were caused by air rushing out of caverns deep in the Earth’s interior.

    The earliest earthquake for which we have descriptive information occurred in China in 1177 B.C. The Chinese earthquake catalog describes several dozen large earthquakes in China during the next few thousand years. Earthquakes in Europe are mentioned as early as 580 B.C., but the earliest for which we have some descriptive information occurred in the mid-16th century. The earliest known earthquakes in the Americas were in Mexico in the late 14th century and in Peru in 1471, but descriptions of the effects were not well documented. By the 17th century, descriptions of the effects of earthquakes were being published around the world – although these accounts were often exaggerated or distorted.

  7. There’s absolutely no record of the first earthquake ever to hit any part of the planet.

    As you already know, earthquakes are natural phenomenons occurring as result of sudden movements in the Earth’s crust. These kinds of movement have been a major part of earth as long as human life itself. In line with this, it’s only logical to assume that there’s no way of telling when the planet experienced the first ever earthquake. The earliest documented ecord we have of an earthquake was somewhere in Europe around 580 BC.

    If I was permitted to, I’d probably suggest that one of the first earthquakes ever to hit the earth was an unrecorded historic incident which is believed to have occurred around the year 1,600 Before Christ. Am talking about the lost city of Atlantis.

    Greek historian, Plato first wrote about the lost city of Atlantis in 360BC. He said it was a city made by half Gods and half humans. In his narration, this city was the earliest known civilization on earth, which had astonishing technological developments even compared to modern day innovations. Unfortunately, Atlantis is believed to have been destroyed by a super volcanic eruption. Given the size of the volcanic activity which wiped out an entire region, it’s only natural for it to trigger other environmental hazards like tsunamis, wildfire, flooding and off course earthquakes. It’s the reason why I think this particular incident with Atlantis is one the earliest times an earthquake was experienced on the planet.

    Another notable example of the earliest earthquake to hit the planet will have to be the biblical story on the Tower of Babel. If the Genesis verse is correct, then the sudden incident that occurred and brought down the building which was suppose to touch the sky would have been a low magnitude earthquake. Do not attack me on this, it’s just my personal and logical reasoning towards certain misunderstood history of man.

    Also, if you go through ancient Greek history, there’s a possibility of coming across certain notable prehistoric incident with similar circumstances usually experienced during an earthquake – involving a particular region experiencing constant shakes on the grounds and eventually collapse of buildings.

    Most of this historic events wouldn’t have been recorded as an earthquake because the term and the incident itself wasn’t understood back then. Most historic cultures would have simply referred an earthquake to the work of the Gods. Thankfully, we know better now.

  8. The most widely felt earthquakes in the recorded history of North America were a series that occurred in 1811-1812 near New Madrid, Missouri. A great earthquake, whose magnitude is estimated to be about 8, occurred on the morning of December 16, 1811

  9. The earliest earthquake for which tyere is descriptive information occurred in China in 1177 B.C. The Chinese earthquake catalog describes several dozen large earthquakes in China during the next few thousand years. Earthquakes in Europe are mentioned as early as 580 B.C., but the earliest for which there are some descriptive information occurred in the mid-16th century. The earliest known earthquakes in the Americas were in Mexico in the late 14th century and in Peru in 1471, but descriptions of the effects were not well documented. By the 17th century, descriptions of the effects of earthquakes were being published around the world – although these accounts were often exaggerated or distorted.

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